Agadir

Next south is AGADIR opposite the Canary Islands, the country’s top beach resort and chief city of Southern Morocco, with exceptionally attractive and comfortable hotels, and clubs, often with private beaches and an average of 300 days of sunshine each year. This lovely modern town with six miles of golden sands is also an important port and market for agricultural products of the Souss valleys. With its entertainment facilities and airport, Agadir is a prime spot for exploring the Ante Atlas and making forays into the western Sahara.

In 1911 it took the international stage. German intrigue centered on Agadir with a gunboat off the coast causing political trouble with France almost leading to a premature start of the First World War.

The city is overlooked by a citadel built in 1540 as a defence against the Portuguese and added to over the centuries. This Kasbah was largely destroyed in a severe earthquake in 1960 and the Government responded with vision, rebuilding a new settlement with low earthquake-resistant buildings and clean and spacious thoroughfares but the ramparts remain looking down to the picturesque fishing port, the leading one of Morocco. There you can buy anything from barracuda to a shark’s tooth and eat in the famed fish restaurants on its fringe.