Casablanca

Casablanca, the White House, the ancient Punic port of Anfa, on the Atlantic Coast, 55 miles south west of Rabat, has a romantic ring to most Europeans and Americans thanks to the Bogart and Bergman Hollywood film (which was not made there) and is famed for the wartime Allied landings and the meeting between Roosevelt, Churchill and de Gaulle.

The city was comparatively small until the French took over and made it the economic capital of Morocco. It supplanted Tangier as the principle port, to-day has a population of more than four million and next to Cairo is the biggest city in Africa.

Today The White Lady, like most large cities, is a little tarnished in places but, the attentive tourist will still succumb to its art deco charms. Marshal Lyautey had it designed in a mix of French-Moroccan style which became known as Mauresque with spacious boulevards set among palms.

Despite industry and a bustling port there are sandy beaches and striking Atlantic sunsets. Primary attractions include the Grand Mosque Hassan II which surely rates as one of the wonders of any century.
Inaugurated in 1993, built by public subscription, it was constructed by 30,000 workers and craftsmen who created an awesome work of beauty, combining all that is best in Islamic art with elements